Marijuana use disorders rise as marijuana use more than doubles

JAMA, Prevalence of Marijuana Use Disorders in the United States Between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013

Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry October 21, 2015

A NIH-funded study published in JAMA concluded that marijuana use in the U.S. has doubled over the period from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, while the increase in marijuana use disorders was almost as large for that period.

Deborah S. Hasin, PhD1,2,3; Tulshi D. Saha, PhD4; Bradley T. Kerridge, PhD5; Risë B. Goldstein, PhD, MPH4; S. Patricia Chou, PhD4; Haitao Zhang, PhD4; Jeesun Jung, PhD4; Roger P. Pickering, MS4; W. June Ruan, MA4; Sharon M. Smith, PhD4; Boji Huang, MD, PhD4; Bridget F. Grant, PhD, PhD4

1Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
2Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York
3New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York
4Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland
5Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York

A NIH-funded study published today in JAMA concluded that marijuana use in the U.S. has doubled over the period from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, while the increase in marijuana use disorders was almost as large for that period.

(Read the study)